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|   SUBMISSION FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

What makes a good submission?
You have 500 words to describe to the GDC Advisory Board what your talk will be about, and why it will be interesting to GDC attendees. This is not the abstract for your talk for the printed program, it is not meant for attendees to read, it is not a teaser, and it is not a place for cute wordplay. It is for you to describe concretely and succinctly what is compelling about your talk to the Advisory Board, a group of people who have probably read 250 of these descriptions by the time they get to yours. Do not tease with something like, "My lecture will reveal amazing findings about how people play puzzle platformers," instead say, "We have found 90% of people only play puzzle platformers while eating pepperoni pizza," or whatever your amazing finding actually is. If you need more than 500 words to describe your lecture in this way, you can upload supplemental materials (.doc, .pdf, .txt) below.
What is considered a sponsored session?
The Game Developers Conference does not accept product or vendor related submissions. If your talk is a thinly-veiled advertisement for a new product, technology or service your company is offering, please do not apply.
What is the submission deadline?
The GDC 2015 Call for Submissions deadline is August 28, 2014.
How do I submit a proposal for the GDC Summits?
If you are interested in submitting for any of the GDC Summits, the call for submission will open after the main call for submissions closes, from September 8 - October 3, 2014.
What do I need to provide in my submission?
The submission form will ask you for:

  • Speaker Contact Information

  • Session Title: Provide a session title in fewer than 16 words

  • Track, Format and Audience Level

  • Session Description: You have 500 words to describe to the GDC Advisory Board what your talk will be about, and why it will be interesting to GDC attendees. This is not the abstract for your talk for the printed program, it is not meant for attendees to read, it is not a teaser, and it is not a place for cute wordplay. It is for you to describe concretely and succinctly what is compelling about your talk to the Advisory Board, a group of people who have probably read 250 of these descriptions by the time they get to yours. Do not tease with something like, "My lecture will reveal amazing findings about how people play puzzle platformers," instead say, "We have found 90% of people only play puzzle platformers while eating pepperoni pizza," or whatever your amazing finding actually is. If you need more than 500 words to describe your lecture in this way, you can upload supplemental materials (.doc, .pdf, .txt) to your submission.

  • Speaker Biography, Game Credits, Speaker History and Twitter username

  • Supporting material: Submit supplemental information that supports your session proposal. Additional materials may include white papers, code, demos, videos, images, proof of concept, etc.
What are some examples of a Phase 1 submission?
  • Sample production submission here.
  • Sample programming submission here.
What does the GDC expect from speakers?
When you agree to speak at GDC, you are making a commitment to deliver a well prepared talk and to speak on the topic you have proposed. We ask that you do not drastically change the submitted topic or content.

You will be evaluated by attendees on how well you delivered your presentation, aim to be among the top 50 presenters for GDC 2015.

We expect our speakers to submit the final version of their presentation to be made available on the GDC Vault.
What are the benefits of speaking?
The benefits of being a speaker include:

  • Complimentary registration
  • Access to all conference sessions, summits, and the expo floor
  • Speaker lunch
  • Invitation to VIP networking event, Level99
  • Your name and presentation featured in our conference program and website
  • A year subscription to the GDC Vault (video and audio recordings of all GDCs)
When will I be notified of the status of my submission?
You will receive an automated email response once your Phase 1 submission is received. We will notify you of the status of your Phase 1 submission in late September 2014. If you do not hear from us, please contact Colleen Mickey.