GDC Vault Adds Free ‘GDC 25’ Videos From McGonigal, Schatz, Siegel

The GDC Vault service has debuted free video talks from Game Developers Conference 2011’s Summits, including Jane McGonigal on “no stinkin’ badges”, Monaco‘s Andy Schatz on winning the IGF, and Playdom’s Scott Jon Siegel on making City Of Wonder.

These talks add to acclaimed lectures from Frank Lantz and Charlie Cleveland, as well as the much-watched classic game postmortem series as part of GDC 2011’s ‘free recordings’ section.

The following lectures from GDC 2011’s wide range of emerging market Summits — which were some of the highlights of this year’s February 28th-March 4th show in San Francisco — are being made free at this time:

In the first newly available GDC Vault video, Social Chocolate’s Jane McGonigal presents a Serious Games Summit keynote named ‘We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Badges: How to Re-invent Reality Without Gamification’.

The talk from the ARG designer and author of ‘Reality Is Broken’ suggests: “Plenty of game developers think gamification sounds cynical and opportunistic — a way to motivate gamers to do something they’ ordinarily avoid… What we need now is a more holistic and whole-hearted approach to using game design to transform reality.”

Another highly rated talk being made available for free in video form on GDC Vault is ‘How to Win the IGF in 15 Weeks or Less’, Andy Schatz’s heartfelt explanation of how he entered heist game Monaco into the 2010 Independent Games Festival after just 6 weeks of one-person work — and unexpectedly came out with the Grand Prize.

Using his Facebook status updates and explaining his state of mind, longtime indie Schatz explains “how design-by-brownian-motion can not only lead to a better finished product, but a faster schedule as well,” with a spontaneous playtest of his acclaimed title jammed into the end of his Independent Games Summit lecture.

Finally, in a Social & Online Games Summit video from GDC 2011, Playdom’s Scott Jon Siegel presents a City Of Wonder postmortem, explaining how the popular social Facebook title “leveraged [player vs. player gameplay] to add a new competitive dimension to the popular city building genre.”

The session examines “how Playdom took inspiration from traditional game mechanics and interpreted them for a casual Facebook audience”, explaining how the team “refined their concept as they moved from early prototypes to a live release, and continue to expand the game’s content and features.

As the team behind the leading worldwide game creation conference, GDC organizers are committed to making many of the event’s best lectures — both current and historical — available for free to the global game community, and will continue rolling out new free content throughout 2011.

Full GDC Vault access is available to GDC 2011 All-Access Pass holders, speakers, and All-Access Pass buyers to other GDC events for the rest of 2011, and subscribers having issues accessing content should contact GDC Vault admins.

Individual Vault subscriptions not tied to All-Access passes have recently launched in a limited-edition Beta invite process — those interested in signing up to be invited in on a first come, first served basis should sign up on the GDC Vault website.

In addition, game-related schools and development studios who sign up for GDC Vault Studio Subscriptions can receive access for their entire office or company. More information on this option is available via viewing an online demonstration.

GDC organizers are also committed to making more archival content free for all during 2011, following a successful ‘GDC 25 Chronicles’ digitization project. GDC historian Jason Scott has been retained for the rest of 2011 to continue digitizing the extensive Game Developers Conference archives, with his ‘Tales From The GDC Vault’ article series highlighting the latest free talks and newly available older material.