The VRDC call for submissions closed October 5, 2018. 

Questions? Email Victoria Petersen for GDC Conference questions, Megan Bundy for GDC Summit and VRDC questions, and Ashley Corrigan for Tutorial questions.

 

Questions?

 Read the FAQ below or email Megan Bundy for GDC Summit and VRDC questions, Victoria Petersen for GDC Conference and Game Career Seminar questions, and Ashley Corrigan for Tutorial questions.

 

Submission Guidelines

If you would like to submit, please take note of the following:

Diversity and Representation

VRDC aims to achieve diversity of voice, experience, and perspective. Please take this goal into consideration when considering who would be best to speak on behalf of your company or department and/or when submitting panelists.

Vendor-Specific Proposals

VRDC does not accept product or vendor-related submissions. If your talk is a thinly veiled advertisement for a new product, technology or service your company is offering, please do not submit. If you would like to publicize a product, please contact GDC sales for information on exhibiting and sponsor opportunities, including sponsored sessions. 

Original Authors

VRDC only accepts submissions by original authors of the presentations. PR firms, speaking relation firms, and all other parties who are not direct authors of submitted presentations are discouraged from submitting a proposal on behalf of their clients/speakers. VRDC requires direct contact with presenters to expedite questions during the submission review process.

GDC Conference (W-F)

The call for submissions to the GDC Conference (W-F) closed on August 16th at 11:59pm PT. Proposals submitted to the GDC Conference are considered by the GDC Advisory Board only. There is no penalty for submitting a proposal to the GDC Conference, Summits and /or VRDC, however should you submit the same topic more than once, keep your audience in mind and adjust similar content as you deem appropriate. Each program has its own advisors and submissions will be reviewed separately. Contact Victoria Petersen for questions about the GDC Conference call for submissions. Click here for more information about the GDC Conference.

 

Selection Criteria

The VRDC Advisors will review and rate submissions based on the following criteria:

  • Concept: This is the basic idea of your submission. Is it interesting? Is it relevant? Will it be beneficial for game developers to hear? There is plenty of room for innovative ideas and also the tried and true.
  • Depth: Is the basic idea well considered and thought out? To what extent will the audience gain insight? The more in-depth, the better.
  • Organization: Are your ideas conducive to present in front of an audience? Will the VRDC Advisors understand what you are trying to say? Organization helps.
  • Credentials: How do your credentials qualify you to speak on the topic you have proposed?
  • Takeaway: Is the attendee going to leave this session knowing something they didn't know when they walked in? Are they learning or being inspired? This is the most important aspect of every VRDC session. The submissions will be rated on a one to five scale by each of the reviewers and the resulting scores are averaged. Submissions in each category with the highest scores are considered first. If there is too much topic overlap, a lesser scoring submission may be selected to keep variety in the program.

 

Speaker Expectations

Conference attendees are generally very intelligent. They are looking for material that is not obvious and expect excellence from VRDC speakers. After your presentation, they will evaluate it based on delivery, knowledge of the topic and the visuals presented. 

Preparation is one of the most important factors in delivering a successful talk at VRDC. Please keep the following in mind when you propose to speak:

  • The proposed outline you submit now must match the talk you present at VRDC
  • Plan to commit AT LEAST 25 HOURS to prepare for your session
  • Rehearse the delivery of your session to be more effective; preferably in front of your peers (one tip is to video tape yourself speaking then review it. This is also a great way to practice pacing and timing) Your presentation materials must be completed and submitted four weeks before VRDC
  • Please note the VRDC Advisors and content team are here to help. If you have ANY additional speaking questions you’d like VRDC to cover, please email Megan Bundy.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the submission deadline?

The VRDC call for submissions close on Friday, October 5th at 11:59pm PT.

What makes a good submission?

  • Review all of the submission guidelines on this page and follow the instructions.
  • Incomplete proposals or proposals that are commercial or marketing in nature will not be considered.
  • Write your proposal so that it is easily understood. Concise, precise language and a discernible thesis will also help your chances in the review process.The advisors will read many submissions. Get to your point as quickly as possible. Consider what the proposal is about. Why is it interesting? How is it important to game development? What will game developers get out of the session?
  • The advisors will read many submissions. Get to your point as quickly as possible. Consider what the proposal is about. Why is it interesting? How is it important to game development? What will game developers get out of the session?

 

What do I need to provide in my submission?

The submission form will require these key items. You may be asked to submit additional materials before a decision is made on your proposal. 

Speaker Contact Information

We require the speaker's direct email address to be associated with the Speaker Profile in the submission form. Should the speaker have a PR or administrative representative assisting with the completion of the submission form, that person's contact info should be entered in the 'PR reps' section of the speaker profile to insure all parties receive conference communication.

VRDC Track

Game VR/AR or Entertainment VR/AR.

Format 

60 or 30-Minute Lecture, 60-Minute Panel.

Audience Level

Advanced, Intermediate, All.

Theme

Experimental, Technical, Inspirational or General.

Session Title 

Provide a session title in fewer than 10 words. Please try to include keywords, topics, and game titles covered in your talk.

Session Description 

In 100-150-words, provide a concise description of your session as you would have it appear on the GDC website. Write in 3rd person, present tense.

Attendee Takeaway

In 50-words or less, tell us what attendees will gain from this presentation. Be specific by giving concrete examples and remember that VRDC attendees are experts in their field. Do not use bullet points, write in 3rd person present tense.

Intended Audience

In 50-words or less, describe your target audience and who will benefit from your presentation. Is prerequisite knowledge necessary for understanding the content of the session? If so, what are the prerequisites? Do not use bullet points, write in 3rd person present tense.

Summary for Advisors

You have 500 words to describe to the VRDC Advisors what your talk will be about, and why it will be interesting to VRDC attendees. This is not the abstract for your talk for the GDC website, it is not meant for attendees to read, it is not a teaser, and it is not a place for cute wordplay. It is for you to describe concretely and succinctly what is compelling about your talk to the advisors, a group of people who have probably read 250 of these descriptions by the time they get to yours. Do not tease with something like, "My lecture will reveal amazing findings about how people play puzzle platformers," instead say, "We have found 90% of people only play puzzle platformers while eating pepperoni pizza," or whatever your amazing finding actually is. If you need more than 500 words to describe your lecture in this way, you can upload supplemental materials (.doc, .pdf, .txt) to your submission.

Supporting Materials

Submit supplemental information that supports your session proposal. Additional materials may include white papers, code, demos, videos, images, proof of concept, etc.

Past Speaking Engagements & Web links

If applicable, list the conferences, the title of the lecture, scores, and references. If you can provide references for these lectures, include a name and contact information. Add links to your company's website(s), personal blog(s), projects you're working on, etc., to support your proposal. Please do not offer links to news articles.

 

What are the session formats?

The final length and format of accepted sessions will be determined by the advisors. Please select what you feel will be the most appropriate.

FormatDurationDescription
Lectures60 or 30 MinutesLectures are issue-oriented, provide concrete examples, and contain both practical and theoretical information. We generally prefer only one speaker but we may accept two if you can demonstrate the second person is necessary. Postmortems and case studies are included in this category.
Panels60 MinutesPanels take many different viewpoints on a topic or issue and combine them in one debate session with a moderator. Debate among panelists (with very different opinions) is welcome and audience participation time should be accounted for. We prefer 60 minute time for this format and no more than 5 people with diverse representation. Include all of the panelists you have confirmed in the proposal. A very limited number of panels will be accepted

How do I choose a session format?

It is very common for us to receive a proposal on a wonderful topic that we want to accept, but that requires a format change. This is not a problem, but if you choose properly, it means we're more likely to trust you to know what you're doing and less likely to micromanage you at every step. This makes it easier for all of us.

60-minute lectures tend to be inspirational, high-level, or wide-ranging talks that cover a subject of broad importance. 30-minute lectures tend to cover a single, narrow topic in depth. Panels tend to examine a controversial or difficult topic with no easy answers and lots of interesting talking points; panels are 60 minutes, which is enough time for about eight planned questions. In all cases, expect to leave a few minutes at the end for Q&A. 

Also consider who is speaking. Most lectures are given by a single person, unless there is a compelling reason that requires multiple speakers (especially for a 30-minute talk, where there is hardly time to switch speakers). Panels generally have a moderator and three or four panelists who are established and known experts on the topic; everyone in the room is likely to have an opinion, after all, so the only reason to make it a panel and not just a list of questions for audience discussion is if the panelists have opinions that are worth listening to. 

Common mistakes: 

  • Taking a narrow topic and pitching it as a 60-minute lecture. If you can squeeze the important stuff into 30 minutes, do so.
  • Taking a 60-minute lecture and having five listed speakers, and/or taking what should be a perfectly good lecture and pitching it as a panel.  Your submission will be scrutinized by industry experts, and adding multiple, unnecessary speakers can raise suspicion that you're thinking more about the speaker perks than audience takeaways.

 

How does the submission and selection process work?

  • We will email you a confirmation when we receive your proposal. If you do not receive this confirmation, contact Megan Bundy.
  • Save the link to your proposal, you can revise your submission details until the deadline.
  • The advisors will review all submissions in the coming months and score them on the criteria below.
  • This composite rating along with past GDC/VRDC session evaluation scores (when applicable) and advisor feedback will determine the status of every submission.

We will notify you of the status of your submission by late November.

These four criteria are considered when reviewing your proposal: 

  • Concept: This is the basic idea of your submission. Is it interesting? Is it relevant? Will it be beneficial for game developers to hear? There is plenty of room for innovative ideas and also the tried and true. 
  • Depth: Is the basic idea well considered and thought out? To what extent will the audience gain insight? The more in-depth, the better.
  • Organization: Are your ideas conducive to present in front of an audience? Will the VRDC Advisors understand what you are trying to say? Organization helps.
  • Credentials: How do your credentials qualify you to speak on the topic you've proposed?
  • Takeaway: Is the attendee going to leave this session knowing something they didn't know when they walked in? Are they learning or being inspired? This is the most important aspect of every VRDC session. Submissions will be rated on a one to five scale by each of the reviewers and the resulting scores are averaged. Submissions in each category with the highest scores are considered first. If there is too much topic overlap, a lesser scoring submission may be selected to keep variety in the program.
  • A Note On Writing Style: Unless we've seen you speak before (or you link to a video of you speaking at some other conference), we tend to assume that your writing style is at least somewhat correlated to your speaking style because that's all we have to go on. Write the way that you would speak at VRDC.

Who will review my proposal?

Advisors to the specific VRDC track you select will review your proposal. They are distinguished industry professionals who volunteer their time to help develop the numerous sessions at VRDC. They work to ensure that the quality of the content provided to attendees is high-level, relevant, and timely.

Select a track below to learn about the Advisors:

What are the benefits of speaking?

The benefits of being a speaker include:

  • Complimentary registration
  • Access to all Conference sessions, VRDC, GDC Summits, and the Expo floor
  • Speaker meal card
  • Invitation to our annual VIP networking event, Level99
  • Your name and presentation featured in our conference program and website
  • A year subscription to the GDC Vault (recordings of all GDC events, past and present)

 

How do I propose a vendor-specific session?

We want our talks to be opportunities for professional game developers to share their ideas and experiences. Proposals that are commercial or marketing in nature will not be considered. In general, content specific to proprietary products and technologies are considered sponsored material. The VRDC Advisors and conference management reserve the right to exercise their editorial discretion. If you would like to publicize a product, please contact GDC sales for information on exhibiting and sponsor opportunities, including sponsored sessions.

What does GDC expect from speakers?

When you agree to speak at GDC or VRDC, you are making a commitment to deliver a well prepared talk and to speak on the topic you have proposed. We ask that you do not drastically change the submitted topic or content. 

You will be evaluated by attendees on how well you delivered your presentation, aim to be among the top 50 presenters. 

We ask our speakers to submit the final version of their presentation to be made available on GDC Vault.

 

When will I be notified of the status of my submission?

You will receive an automated email response once your submission is received. We will notify you of the status of your submission by late November. If you do not hear from us by then, please contact Megan Bundy.

 

How should a PR Rep or Executive Assistant submit on behalf of a potential speaker?

First, it is ideal for the speakers themselves to submit as they can provide the most detail about the content. However, if you are a PR representative or someone submitting on behalf of a potential speaker, fill in the speaker's contact info in the first section and also list the speaker's information in the speaker profile section, but be sure to add yourself as the 'PR contact' associated with the speaker profile(s). This will insure that you receive all email correspondence relating to VRDC in the same email as the speaker(s). Without complete speaker details, the submission will be considered incomplete and will not be able to advance until speaker contact info is received.

Who should I contact with additional questions?

Please contact Megan Bundy with any additional questions.

VRDC Tracks & Topics of Interest

The VRDC Advisors are seeking proposals on the following topics, which are the foundation of the programs this year. However, feel free to submit your own original ideas for consideration as well. At GDC and VRDC, we aim to achieve diversity of voice, experience and perspective. When considering who would be best to speak on behalf of your company or department, we strongly encourage taking this goal into consideration.

Game VR/AR Track

Advisors are soliciting submissions exploring virtual, augmented and mixed reality in game development, pertaining to topics across multiple disciplines including Design, Production, Programming, and Visual Art. Submissions should be representative of interesting and current work happening in VR/AR/MR game development and have valuable, actionable and/or inspiring takeaways for the VRDC audience.

Entertainment VR/AR Track

Virtual, augmented and mixed reality is about so much more than just games. For the Entertainment VR/AR Track, advisors are soliciting submissions spanning VR/AR/MR application, design, implementation and development across multiple industries including Entertainment, Travel, Retail, Fitness, Product Design, Journalism and Sports Entertainment. If you're developing an immersive VR, AR, or MR experience or application that goes beyond games, we want to hear about it!

 

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